Tina Seelig: The 6 Characteristics of Truly Creative People

[My notes while watching this video.]

1. Foster your imagination by:

a. Framing and re-framing problems: Challenge yourself to look at things from different perspectives.

  • Question your questions
  • ie: Instead of 5+5=? why not ask ?+?=10 to encourage creative thinking? [My note: Well, I think we need 5+5 at some point, but we could choose not to focus on it. Because technically, ?+?=10 is algebra and not simple math.]

b. Connecting and combining different ideas: Putting things together in interesting ways

  • Shin-dogu (珍道具)- Japanese art of creating un-useless inventions… putting things together in surprising ways. [The things] are not useful. They’re not useless, but when you put them together, interesting things happen.

c. Challenging your assumptions

  • ie: Produce something of value with material in a garbage. What is “value” to you?

2. Imagination is not enough to make things happen, because you need to start with a basic knowledge, a toolbox for your imagination.

a. Paying attention: We don’t usually pay attention to the world in a way that reveals interesting solutions.

  • ie: A friend while commuting noticed how businesses are influenced by weather. He started a weather insurance company.

3. Attitude (In addition to imagination and knowledge)

a. Need to be driven, motivated, and have confidence to solve a problem. What if you are missing one piece of your puzzle, how driven are you to find that piece? On that note…

b. True innovators are not puzzle-builders but quilt-makers. Put together what you have into a quilt.

These are the insides of the innovation engine. Knowledge is the toolbox for imagination, imagination is the catalyst to change knowledge into new ideas, and attitude is the engine.

But we still have a problem: Environments that do not foster creativity.

4. Habitat- People, rewards, incentives, physical space

a. Space is the stage for your life- need “creative” spaces.

5. Resources- (Money), people, natural resources, processes, community

a. When building our quilt, look beyond money.

6. Culture (Which infuses an entire organization)

a. Change how we see “failure.” “Failure” is not failure. It just shows what does not work, it is data. Celebrate them, learn from them.

b. Culture is powerful. It is the background music of your world, and it can powerfully influence how you feel and act.

Images are screencaps from the video.

neurosciencestuff

neurosciencestuff:

People who are aware they are asleep when they are dreaming have better than average problem-solving abilities, new research has discovered.

image

Experts from the University of Lincoln, UK, say that those who experience ‘lucid dreaming’ – a phenomena where someone who is asleep can recognise…

To study creativity (as well as all other topics) in the brain, our current technology is very dissatisfying. “fMRI” seems to be trending, and the images are nice to look at, but they don’t tell much beyond what areas blood level is changing in (which we interpret as brain activity). MEG is awesome real-time, but has no spatial resolution, as in we don’t where the activity is, specifically. This page sums it up really nicely. It’ll be interesting to see where the use of light-field microscopy will go though.

When I thought about what I could do to contribute, I couldn’t really come up with anything. I tried thinking of what else we could use to image. We use current/magnetic field, blood flow, etc… what else can we use? Anyway, thinking I couldn’t come up with anything new at the moment, I turned to brainstorming about what I would like to modify. My choice: EEG.

EEG gives poor spatial resolution and is not as powerful as the MEG, but it is the technique that has been the most industrialized/ made into products for non-researchers. Neurosky and Emotiv are some major companies that create such brain-computer interfaces. (It’s been used to study dancers while they danced.)

It would be great if we could modify it so they’re (close to being) comparable to EEG used in the lab as well as (relatively, really) cheap, easy to use, waterproof, and comfortable.

Anyway, this post was made kind of for myself so I can access all the links. We’ll see where I go from here.

Image description:

Top. fMRI data was used to create this three-dimensional surface projection. This one is from a study done on jazz improvisation, which is considered a creativity study. Article found here.

Bottom: Graphic showing resolution of different neuroimaging techniques. Found here.

Creative Spaces
Spaces for Creativity 
(Image from here)
I have posted on creative spaces before, but I have been thinking about them lately and wanted to write something.
There are sometimes these hype articles on choosing certain colors to paint your wall, having high-ceiling open spaces, etc. to encourage creativity. That’s good and all, but more important than the wall color is definitely what objects you have in the room (and how they are arranged). Do they evoke imagination, encourage exploration, and excite the mind? Are the spaces where people will feel safe and want to try out new things?
It would be nice if there was an area within the room or nearby where it’s less stimulating for when one wants to ruminate during “incubation” period.
Once we have thought and planned for the objects can we shift our attention to wall color and other things.
Speaking of walls though, I personally wouldn’t care as much about their color as I would about what I can do on them. I would spend more time planning how I could decorate or draw on the walls. Large sheets of paper easily attached and detached to the walls? A white board? Or just keep the walls to decorate with created artworks and get a separate clear plexiglass/glass panel to draw on?
How would you make your current room a more creative space?

Creative Spaces

Spaces for Creativity

(Image from here)

I have posted on creative spaces before, but I have been thinking about them lately and wanted to write something.

There are sometimes these hype articles on choosing certain colors to paint your wall, having high-ceiling open spaces, etc. to encourage creativity. That’s good and all, but more important than the wall color is definitely what objects you have in the room (and how they are arranged). Do they evoke imagination, encourage exploration, and excite the mind? Are the spaces where people will feel safe and want to try out new things?

It would be nice if there was an area within the room or nearby where it’s less stimulating for when one wants to ruminate during “incubation” period.

Once we have thought and planned for the objects can we shift our attention to wall color and other things.

Speaking of walls though, I personally wouldn’t care as much about their color as I would about what I can do on them. I would spend more time planning how I could decorate or draw on the walls. Large sheets of paper easily attached and detached to the walls? A white board? Or just keep the walls to decorate with created artworks and get a separate clear plexiglass/glass panel to draw on?

How would you make your current room a more creative space?

creativesomething

creativesomething:

“A whole world of thinkers and creators would have died before they began if they had listened to the people telling them what not to do.”

There’s a certain level of naivety that must be in-place for creativity to occur.

When we get too comfortable with the way things are – or when we…

Reading to Your Child Starting at Birth: It’s Good for Learning, Thinking, Imagining, and Relating
"A child whose parents read to her, starting from birth, is more likely to do well in every area of life. She’ll start school with better language skills, find it easier to make and keep friends, feel better about herself, stay in school longer, and do better, both personally and professionally. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics is now asking 62,000 pediatricians across America to talk to parents about the importance of reading."
No way, really?

Reading to Your Child Starting at Birth: It’s Good for Learning, Thinking, Imagining, and Relating

"A child whose parents read to her, starting from birth, is more likely to do well in every area of life. She’ll start school with better language skills, find it easier to make and keep friends, feel better about herself, stay in school longer, and do better, both personally and professionally. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics is now asking 62,000 pediatricians across America to talk to parents about the importance of reading."

No way, really?